From October 3, 2001: Making the right decision

On the John

Making the right decision

Originally published in the Indiana Daily Student on October 3, 2001

Now THAT'S a hall-of-fame face.
George Bush freaks out.

I am not going to war. I cannot kill anyone, and I don’t wish to try. If we do go to war, I am not going. This is about the only certainty I have been able to decide on since the attack. That is my reaction to war. However, no one seems to know what is right when it comes to our country’s reaction to the attacks. Some think we should bomb the hell out of Afghanistan, killing Osama bin Laden and anyone else who happens to be there. Others think that we should try to better understand why the terrorists did what they did, and try to then work out our differences peacefully.  Continue reading “From October 3, 2001: Making the right decision”

Bear Down and Get Some Runs, best-of: Prologue

Bartman

What hurts most is that I started counting outs after the sixth. I’d never done it before, but I just couldn’t help myself. Florida went 1-2-3 in the top half, the Cubs scored once to push their lead to two-zip in the bottom half, and when we entered the seventh, I quietly announced to myself and a few others in the bar that we were nine outs away. The top of the seventh ended with no damage done, and after each out recorded I grew more and more confident, my countdown growing louder and louder, until I was practically screaming in a relax-Jack-we’re-not-there-yet-but-GODDAMN-is-this-exciting! kind of a way. The Cubs scored once in their half of the seventh to take a 3-0 lead, and so we headed into the eighth, six outs away from the World Series. Continue reading “Bear Down and Get Some Runs, best-of: Prologue”

From September 25, 2001: One Team, One Field

On the John

One team, one field

Originally published in the Indiana Daily Student on September 25, 2001

Mike Piazza and his NYPD helmet.
Mike Piazza and his NYPD helmet.

Placed 13th for the opinion-writing portion of the Hearst Journalism Award

A funny thing happened this week at sports arenas across America. One team showed up at each game, and that team had one set of fans. Jersey colors were incidental. In fact, no one even noticed them.

The jersey colors that were important were the red, white, and blue stitched in and stamped on. The New York Mets wore hats and helmets on the field that said “FDNY” and “NYPD,” and embraced the Atlanta Braves on the field, the team that they were chasing in a now inconsequential pennant race. Continue reading “From September 25, 2001: One Team, One Field”